Drugs & Medications

Drugs & Medications Articles

Feeling the burn? Antacids can provide some relief

Over-the-counter antacids may be effective at managing occasional bouts of heartburn. But persistent heartburn should be checked out by a doctor, who may want to prescribe medication or look for underlying medical causes. (Locked) More »

Muscle aches from statins: Real, but sometimes imagined?

About 10% of people report muscle aches when taking statins. In some cases, other health conditions such as arthritis, obesity, or just aging may be to blame. Doing exercise or yard work can cause muscle aches, which some people mistakenly attribute to statins. Another possible explanation: a phenomenon known as the nocebo effect, in which people experience negative side effects from a drug, placebo, or other treatment based on an expectation of harm. Muscle-related problems associated with statins usually resolve with a lower statin dose or a change to a different statin. (Locked) More »

Nothing to sneeze at

Older adults can develop seasonal allergies—also known as hay fever, even if they never had them before. The best ways to help avoid allergy symptoms and manage their severity is to track the daily pollen count, use certain over-the-counter medication as needed, and potentially take allergy vaccines to build up resistance to specific allergens. More »

What happens if my stent stops working?

Complications with stents—the tiny wire-mesh tubes used to prop open blocked arteries—are less common than in the past. When problems occur, possible treatments include medications, re-stenting, or bypass surgery. (Locked) More »

Choosing an over-the-counter allergy medication

There are two primary ways over-the-counter (OTC) medications help manage allergies. One is by blocking the effects of histamine with a medication called an antihistamine, such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl) or loratidine (Claritin). Another way is by suppressing the immune system response before it releases histamine. This is done with corticosteroid nasal sprays. OTC versions include budesonide (Rhinocort), fluticasone propionate (Flonase), and triamcinolone (Nasacort). A combination of an antihistamine and a corticosteroid nasal spray is often the most effective treatment. (Locked) More »

Don't ignore vaginal dryness and pain

Vaginal dryness, irritation, and pain during intercourse affect 50% of women after menopause and are caused by declining estrogen levels in the body. A study showed that vaginal estrogen and moisturizers are equally effective in reducing symptoms in some women. But existing treatments often fall short of providing full relief. (Locked) More »

The growing problem of an enlarged prostate gland

By age 60, about half of all men will have an enlarged prostate. While the condition does not increase the risk of getting prostate cancer or having sexual problems, it can affect quality of life, specifically with annoying and embarrassing urination problems. Certain medications can help relieve symptoms, which means less urinary urgency and fewer nighttime awakenings to use the bathroom. More »